Demand Response

Demand Response

Demand response (DR) is an energy management strategy that consumers use to temporarily reduce their loads during periods of peak demand. Whether their power (kW) or fuel (BTU/h) demand reductions are motivated by time-dependent rates, or to help maintain the reliability of the distribution system, DR strengthens the link between the price of consuming energy, and the cost of supplying it.

Building owners and managers use DR to capture the significant financial, operational, and environmental benefits that can be realized when energy demand becomes more responsive to market signals.


  • e-News #96: Commissioning for Code Compliance
    January 12, 2015
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    Commissioning is an integral component of energy efficient building design, construction, and operation. The goal of commissioning is to ensure that the design and construction of building systems meets the owner’s needs, and that building equipment is functioning optimally during occupancy. The California Commissioning Collaborative defines commissioning as ...

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  • e-News #95: Building Dashboards – Monitor, Measure, Manage
    November 25, 2014
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    Energy information systems (EIS) in buildings... have been around for years, starting as humble building automation systems and developing through the years into more robust energy management control systems providing whole-building energy use information.  The addition of visualization features – more commonly called dashboards – to EIS is growing in popularity because, much like an automobile’s dashboard, a great deal of information is conveyed quickly and easily.  Just as drivers can see how fast a car is traveling, check how much gas remains in the tank, or see an engine light when driving, building staff have the ability to review and evaluate building operations in real time.

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  • e-News #94: Lighting Performance Advances
    September 17, 2014
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    New Sources & Controls... Through the past 20 years, new lighting technologies have been a major driver of increasing energy efficiency in buildings. Lighting specifiers and consumers have embraced CFLs, LEDs, and other highly efficient lighting options. How can even more efficiency savings be mined from the lighting end use?

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  • Design Guidelines: Automated Demand Response
    June 9, 2014
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    Automated demand response (ADR) uses technology to send signals directly to energy management control systems (EMCSs) or other devices, allowing buildings to shed loads automatically. ADR provides more reliable load reductions than traditional methods of Demand Response (DR) because it does not rely on human intervention.

    As awareness of ADR's economic and environmental benefits has grown, stakeholders have come together to enact legal and voluntary standards and incentive programs to bring more electrical load under automatic control.

    This document presents a concise set of practical guidelines to help design professionals, project owners, and other stakeholders to identify and incorporate ADR into new construction and major renovation projects in the commercial sector.

    Major topics include: current ADR-related legal requirements under California’s 2013 Title 24 building energy efficiency codes, estimating a project’s potential ADR load shed, specifying equipment for ADR, and

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  • Trigger Sheet: Nonresidential Lighting Controls for New Construction
    November 21, 2013
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    Trigger Sheets: This handy trigger sheet summarizes sections of Title 24, Part 6 energy code that are triggered based on project scope.  The sections indicated on these trigger sheets can help identify energy code requirements for your project.

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  • Design Brief: Demand Response
    June 17, 2013
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    Demand response (DR) is an energy management strategy that allows electricity consumers to receive financial compensation for temporarily reducing or rescheduling power use upon request. DR creates opportunities for building owners and managers to realize financial, operational, and environmental benefits by changing energy use patterns in response to market signals.

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  • e-News #64: Massive Buildings Yield Passive Savings
    April 21, 2009
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    Incorporating thermal mass into the design of a building is a completely passive way of reducing annual heating and cooling energy use and shifting the summer peak demand to later in the day. In architectural terms, thermal mass refers to the incorporation of solid or liquid materials into the building design to absorb heat or cold and then release it later to moderate building temperature swings.

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  • e-News #59: Optimizing HVAC Performance with CO²-Based Demand Controlled Ventilation
    February 1, 2007
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    In commercial buildings, the actual number of people within the building at any given time is frequently lower than the designed peak occupancy. If the building has a conventional HVAC system that delivers a fixed rate of outside air pegged to the peak occupancy, the result can be overventilation and a waste of energy and money.

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  • e-News #58: Lighting Automation Strategies for Commercial Buildings
    January 1, 2007
    1 comments

    In decades past, electric lighting controls were usually nothing more complicated than manual switches that turned an individual light or a group of lights on and off. In certain situations today, such as small-scale buildings, warehouses supervised by a single building manager, and some private offices, this basic strategy may still be appropriate.

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  • Design Brief: Energy Management Systems
    May 1, 2006
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    On average, energy management systems save about 10 percent of overall annual building energy consumption. An energy management system (EMS) is a computer that controls the operation of all major building systems, in order to run the building efficiently and effectively. An EMS can reduce a building's overall energy use by about 10 percent.

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