ArchSIM Case Studies: Modernization of Oakland High School Earns High Marks for Energy Efficiency and Comfort

March 9, 2010
 
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The modernization project at Oakland High School consisted of major renovations in Building E (a 5,573 SF wellness center) and Building F (a 20,400 SF historic shop building). In addition, the project included the construction of one new building, Building G (a 16,320 SF classroom building). In addition to the challenge of renovating aging buildings to provide a healthy and productive educational environment, the design team also had to meet stringent energy efficiency requirements.

In the spring of 2007, the Oakland Unified School District's Board of Education passed a District Sustainability and High Performance Schools Resolution. A key component of this resolution is the requirement that all new school building projects in the district meet sustainability requirements defined by the Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS).

The 2006 edition of CHPS has a prerequisite (EE1.0) for minimum energy performance stipulating that projects must exceed 2005 Title 24 requirements by at least 10 percent on a Time-Dependent Valuation (TDV) basis. This is a prerequisite that all CHPS projects must achieve. Recognizing the important role that energy efficiency plays in school operations and environmental stewardship, the district has gone further by setting a minimum performance goal of exceeding Title 24 by at least 20 percent for their new construction and renovation projects.

Due to the unique features of the two existing buildings, the design team had to define different energy efficiency measures for each building. The team rose to the challenge and created designs for each of the three buildings that exceeded Title 24 requirements by at least 30 percent (Figures 1-3). Of equal significance is that the building systems enhance occupant comfort at the same time that they achieve their high degree of energy efficiency. The buildings employ advanced lighting and HVAC systems that provide a comfortable learning environment for the students, while reducing energy cost.

The modernization project at Oakland High School consisted of major renovations in Building E (a 5,573 SF wellness center) and Building F (a 20,400 SF historic shop building). In addition, the project included the construction of one new building, Building G (a 16,320 SF classroom building). In addition to the challenge of renovating aging buildings to provide a healthy and productive educational environment, the design team also had to meet stringent energy efficiency requirements.

In the spring of 2007, the Oakland Unified School District's Board of Education passed a District Sustainability and High Performance Schools Resolution. A key component of this resolution is the requirement that all new school building projects in the district meet sustainability requirements defined by the Collaborative for High Performance Schools (CHPS).

The 2006 edition of CHPS has a prerequisite (EE1.0) for minimum energy performance stipulating that projects must exceed 2005 Title 24 requirements by at least 10 percent on a Time-Dependent Valuation (TDV) basis. This is a prerequisite that all CHPS projects must achieve. Recognizing the important role that energy efficiency plays in school operations and environmental stewardship, the district has gone further by setting a minimum performance goal of exceeding Title 24 by at least 20 percent for their new construction and renovation projects.

Due to the unique features of the two existing buildings, the design team had to define different energy efficiency measures for each building. The team rose to the challenge and created designs for each of the three buildings that exceeded Title 24 requirements by at least 30 percent (Figures 1-3). Of equal significance is that the building systems enhance occupant comfort at the same time that they achieve their high degree of energy efficiency. The buildings employ advanced lighting and HVAC systems that provide a comfortable learning environment for the students, while reducing energy cost.
 
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